Sheila B Robinson

Reflections of an everyday educator/program evaluator/professional developer…LEARNER


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13 Ways to Express Your Resoluteness in ’13

I’m at a crossroads at the close of twenty-twelve – ready to welcome the new year with pronouncement of intentions for making good in 2013 but, ever the evaluator, pressured also to assess promises past. As I consider options for reflection or resolution, it occurs to me that we have an array of alternatives for framing the latter.

Are you ready to make your ’13 proclamations? Here we go: You can… make resolutions, set goals, objectives, or aims, express intentions or aspirations, announce expected outcomes or impacts, identify key performance indicators or key result areas, espouse your visions, or begin with the end in mind.  Continue reading


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Evaluators are humans, TWO!

As part of his launch team, I introduced Daniel H. Pink’s new book, To Sell is Human, in a recent post (see Evaluators are humans, too!). Pink’s premise is that regardless of our chosen fields, we’re all in sales – even those of us in what he calls “non-sales selling.” As a matter of course, we must all move others.

Eagles Mere, PA

©2006 Photo by SheilaBRobinson

Especially engaging for an evaluator is Pink’s chapter on Clarity, one of the “new ABCs of selling” – Attunement, Buoyancy, and Clarity. Pink sees clarity as “the capacity to help others see their situations in fresh and more revealing ways and to identify problems they didn’t realize they had.” What resonates with me is the notion of the value of problem-finding over problem-solving. The Information Age has given us access to all manner of solutions to our problems, but not necessarily to their identification. “The services of others are far more valuable,” claims Pink “when I’m mistaken, confused, or completely clueless about my true problem.”  Continue reading


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A Collector’s Paradise (if you enjoy evaluation, that is…)

Just as I love collecting data (see my post Like an Evaluator in a Data Store), I love gathering evaluation resources. If only googling counted as exercise {sigh}. So, in the holiday spirit of giving, I offer you a brief glimpse of a few favorites from my prized collection:  Continue reading


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Evaluators are humans too!

Pink is the new black! I declare that with no reference whatsoever to disease, retailers, or fashion.

Today, I’m plugging a new and exciting read, To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth about Moving Others, by Daniel H. Pink, author of two of my favorite books, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, and A Whole New Mind: Why Right Brainers Will Rule the Future. I’m honored to be part of Dan’s launch team for this new book, due out December 31. I receive no compensation for this other than an advance copy of the book so that I can help spread the word, along with the same free goodie package offered to anyone who pre-orders the book prior to December 30. More on this in a moment…  Continue reading


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Can a DataViz novice become a slide snob?

Yes. Yes, I can. Like so many other evaluators (and journalists, presenters, trainers, etc.) I’ve been sucked into the compelling world of Data Visualization and Reporting, Infographics, and the art of presentation. It’s evaluspheric reform at its best. In fact, I can see a new branch growing on Christina Christie and Marvin Alkin’s Evaluation Theory Tree. It’s the REPORTING branch, and it’s just starting to bud. It will certainly feature data visualization leaders and thinkers, and I imagine the first name to appear near the base will be Evergreen (hey, now THAT’S a name that works, given the tree metaphor!).

Stephanie Evergreen’s Potent Presentations Initiative (P2i) has helped launch a new wave of evaluation DataViz & Reporting enthusiasts, and catalyzed my newest learning journey which included giving my first Ignite Presentation at AEA2012. Back in 2010, John Nash mentioned two fabulous books in this aea365 post: Nancy Duarte’s Slide:ology, and Garr Reynolds’ Presentation Zen.  I can assure you, they’re both WELL worth the investment. Susan Kistler (among others) has posted and presented many, many tech tools and resources to fuel the cravings of any data or tech geek (a quick search on aea365 yields over a dozen of her posts on the topic).  Continue reading